Grab the popcorn and join a class of like-minded individuals.

Attending one of our film classes means you’ll get to explore film history across a broad range of genres, time periods and regions, from classic Hollywood films to independent film and television. 

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Learn the meaning behind famous films and television shows

Throughout our film classes, you'll learn about all aspects of the film industry, including how films generate meaning and how actors and producers contribute to them. From cult classics to modern day blockbusters, you’ll be immersed in the world of cinematography.  

Our specialised film tutors will discuss up-to-date trends in the industry, empowering you to develop a broad set of skills. You’ll build your awareness of the evolution of film history as an art form and business too, charting the development of film and television through the ages. 

Find film classes near you 

At SPƵվ, we offer courses in a range of venues as well as online. Whether you’re in a classroom or learning from our bedroom, lounge or kitchen, you’ll still get the same support from your tutor.   

The support you’ll receive 

All our courses are friendly and supportive, helping you build your confidence as well as your understanding of the magical world of film. At the end of your course with us, you’ll leave with a new network of people, all of whom share the same interest and passion as you.

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Film & Media: How to Read Film

Part of the Free to All Summer Taster Courses: Do you like films and are keen to learn more and discuss them with like-minded enthusiasts? Have you wondered “How did they do that?” Or even more so “Why did that film make me feel like this? “Are you thinking about enrolling on one of the SPƵվ’s film studies courses? Then this free taster session is for you. You’ll get equipped with some of the basics of “how to read a film” – the key elements of filmmaking and how they create (different) meanings, emotions and impacts on the viewer, enabling you analyse films with greater confidence.

Course Information

Dates:
Wed 17/07/2024 -
Wed 17/07/2024
Times:
4:00pm - 7:00pm
Duration:
1 sessions
Location:
Online
Tutor:
Ruth Mulandi
Course code:
Q00016976
How you'll learn:
Online
Availability:
0 places remaining
Status:
Waiting list
Fee:
Free

Film & Media: World Cinema

We will consider a range of films, from classics to contemporary cinema. We will discuss the style and meaning of diverse extracts drawing on key ideas from Film Studies. We will consider films from diverse countries, comparing and contrasting these with American and British cinema. The class will be organised around discussion of selected extracts, with guidance on points to look for, including different aspects of film such as the screenplay and cinematography. Students will be encouraged to develop their responses in small groups. Case studies will be included on Alfred Hitchcock and British cinema.

Course Information

Dates:
Mon 16/09/2024 -
Mon 25/11/2024
Times:
6:30pm - 8:30pm
Duration:
10 sessions
Location:
Online
Tutor:
Daniel Williams
Course code:
Q00017427
How you'll learn:
Online
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £84.00

World Cinema

We will consider a range of films, from classics to contemporary cinema. We will discuss the style and meaning of diverse extracts drawing on key ideas from Film Studies. We will consider films from diverse countries, comparing and contrasting these with American and British cinema. The class will be organised around discussion of selected extracts, with guidance on points to look for, including different aspects of film such as the screenplay and cinematography. Students will be encouraged to develop their responses in small groups. Case studies will be included on Alfred Hitchcock and British cinema.

Course Information

Dates:
Mon 16/09/2024 -
Mon 25/11/2024
Times:
6:30pm - 8:30pm
Duration:
10 sessions
Location:
Online
Tutor:
Daniel Williams
Course code:
Q00017611
How you'll learn:
Online
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £84.00

World Cinema

We will consider a range of films, from classics to contemporary cinema. We will discuss the style and meaning of diverse extracts drawing on key ideas from Film Studies. We will consider films from diverse countries, comparing and contrasting these with American and British cinema. The class will be organised around discussion of selected extracts, with guidance on points to look for, including different aspects of film such as the screenplay and cinematography. Students will be encouraged to develop their responses in small groups. Case studies will be included on Alfred Hitchcock and British cinema.

Course Information

Dates:
Tue 17/09/2024 -
Tue 26/11/2024
Times:
10:00am - 12:00pm
Duration:
10 sessions
Location:
Compass Theatre (Ickenham)
Glebe Avenue
Ickenham
UB10 8PD
Tutor:
Daniel Williams
Course code:
Q00017582
How you'll learn:
In venue
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £100.00

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For just £15 a year, you can:

  • Join our popular, award-winning weekly lecture series,
  • Access an archive of over 100 past lectures,
  • Get priority online and phone booking for autumn courses (England only),
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  • Attend our members’ annual conference.

Just add us to your basket to sign up today!

Membership Information

Duration:
12 months
Fee:
SPƵվ Membership

Film & Media: 5 Forgotten Classics from Ealing & Gainsborough

Exploring five arguably lesser known classics produced by British film studios Ealing and would be ‘rivals’ Gainsborough, both stalwarts of 1940s and early 1950s cinema. Ealing Studios are still renown for their many now classic comedies produced throughout the 1940s and into the 50s but perhaps the repeated focus on the same films has lead to other equally remarkable classics from their own studio becoming overshadowed. Likewise, a repeated focus on Ealing Studios has perhaps stolen praise from other British studio of the era Gainsborough. This course aims to reinvestigate some of these ‘forgotten’ classics.

Course Information

Dates:
Fri 20/09/2024 -
Fri 18/10/2024
Times:
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Duration:
5 sessions
Location:
Online
Tutor:
George Cromack
Course code:
Q00017778
How you'll learn:
Online
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £37.00

Film & Media: 5 Classic British Crime Thrillers Revisited

What does it take to keep the audience on the edge of their seat for the classic film thriller experience? What happens when crime is thrown into the mix? We explore five examples now regarded as classics of this genre and question – do they all have far more than ‘just’ generic entertainment value? For a brief period in the 1980s, it appeared as though the crime thriller expressed something about what was perhaps a changing, or changed Britain – we examine two of these films, The Long Good Friday and Mona Lisa. Classics such as Brighton Rock provide an interesting and historical British cinematic parallel to the gangster and noir films of 30s and 40s U.S. Whereas, Get Carter, a film now regarded as an icon of national cinema was initially conceived as a trashy ‘pot-boiler’ for the U.S drive-in market, leaving some to argue it could be viewed as more of a ‘revenge Western’ set in North East England? Whilst Danny Boyle’s Shallow Grave seemingly reinvigorates the genre into something arguably more sophisticated and/or accessible in the 1990s? What common techniques do these films employ and what do they say thematically about reoccurring anxieties and tensions of the societies which produced and consumed them? Can filmmakers still learn from these or have some now dated in their power to keep us on the edge of the seat? Mona Lisa (1986), The Long Good Friday (1980), Get Carter (1971), Brighton Rock (1948), Shallow Grave (1994).

Course Information

Dates:
Mon 23/09/2024 -
Mon 21/10/2024
Times:
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Duration:
5 sessions
Location:
Online
Tutor:
George Cromack
Course code:
Q00018209
How you'll learn:
Online
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £37.00

Film Studies: 10 Award Winners Revisited

From the Academy Awards (nicknamed - ‘The Oscars’) to Cannes and the BAFTAs, sometimes it seems as though one film often dominates major categories, in 2024 this was Oppenheimer, but what were the judges really looking for, are box office figures really enough to stand the test of time with audiences? We compare this to films such as Gone With the Wind, a film still well known and highly regarded but now increasing questioned for its representation of slavery and questionable moments of morality. Do we need to remember and appreciate what this film won its awards for in the first place? Smaller scale, more micro-budget film productions such as Bait as perhaps just as important for their creative innovation and social commentary on a moment in time/history - yet it takes a different kind of award to recognise this – are awards more important for getting emerging talent recognised way from the box office. How important are awards for ‘International’ cinema such as The Power of the Dog, The Boy and the Heron and Perfect Days – what does this term really mean? Do award winning films say as much if not more about the sociological, political, technological and/or pop-cultural moments in time they were made as much as anything else? From the big hits to a near miss or two, we have fun, discuss and come to understand and appreciate the themes, approaches and creative decisions behind each of these films, broaden our knowledge of the subject area and cinema in general. The Holdovers (2023), Oppenheimer (2023), Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017), Perfect Days (2023), The Conversation (1974), Gone with the Wind (1939), The Power of the Dog (2021) Bait (2019), The Boy and the Heron (2023) Oliver! (1968).

Course Information

Dates:
Mon 23/09/2024 -
Mon 02/12/2024
Times:
7:00pm - 9:00pm
Duration:
11 sessions
Location:
Stephen Joseph Theatre (Scarborough)
Westborough
Scarborough
YO11 1JW
Tutor:
George Cromack
Course code:
Q00018211
How you'll learn:
In venue
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £92.40

Film & Media: 5 Flights of Fantasy

Are too many too quick to dismiss the fantasy genre as pure entertainment and/or escapist spectacle? Are there varying degrees of fantasy on screen, rendering the term fantasy film as something rather too broad? We examine a selection of five films, all using elements of fantasy to tell their stories. In Orlando, adapted from literature, elements of fantasy are used to highlight inequalities within society. Young Einstein, a film derided by critics in the U.S, makes use of alterative history and elements of surrealism to both entertain and arguably present some deeper comments regarding humanity and innovation, does its fantastical approach help or hinder? Labyrinth offers a unique screen vision by immersing the viewer in a vivid fantasy world earning itself cult status to this day but is it for children, adults or both? Spirited Away makes use of animation to comment on the modern world, here, the fantasy element is fundamental to its approach. More recent films such as Barbie prove fantasy can be big at the box office, using a variety of different approaches to both entertain and relevant social comment. Are all these fantasy films as much if not far more than meet the eye? Are there any reoccurring themes approaches? And is fantasy an ideal medium for the screen? Orlando (1992), Young Einstein (1988), Labyrinth (1986), Barbie (2023), Spirited Away (2001).

Course Information

Dates:
Tue 24/09/2024 -
Tue 22/10/2024
Times:
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Duration:
5 sessions
Location:
Online
Tutor:
George Cromack
Course code:
Q00018213
How you'll learn:
Online
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £37.00

Film & Media: 5 More Wonders of New Hollywood Cinema & Beyond

With the decline of the old Hollywood studio system, a new generation of film makers, many of them exposed to international cinema at film school, expressed themselves on screen with individual voices and a counter culture attitude. Key to this selection of films is the notion of a ‘crisis of public myth’ echoed throughout this period – just who are the heroes and who are the villains? We examine better known and continually highly acclaimed films such as Cool Hand Luke, was it just recycling the chain gang film or doing something more? The Outlaw Josey Wales as an example of the ‘Revisionist Western’ which came out of this period with its differing representation of the people and events of the Old West as previously seen in Classic Hollywood. The Last American Hero arguably questioning youthful attitudes, the law, freedom and the concept of the popular ‘folk heroes’ in a modern corporate world. Cult favourite, The Swimmer offering an example of more unusual comment on materialism, a crisis of national identity and more. With the Blues Brothers serving as an example a film carrying the New Hollywood baton in its attitude and approach after the blockbusters of the mid 1970s, mixing genres in a more comedic, musical and anti-realist style. All promoting knowledge of the subject matter and enthusiasm for film in general. Cool Hand Luke (1967), The Last American Hero (1973), The Swimmer (1968), The Blues Brothers (1980), The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976)

Course Information

Dates:
Mon 04/11/2024 -
Mon 02/12/2024
Times:
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Duration:
5 sessions
Location:
Online
Tutor:
George Cromack
Course code:
Q00018212
How you'll learn:
Online
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £37.00

Film & Media: 5 Wonders from International Directors

Away from any specific film movements or ‘waves’ relevant to their own countries, some filmmakers seem to earn greater acclaim internationally, often making films set outside their own native country, yet still telling the stories and expressing the themes they wish to portray. We examine what some of these, perhaps universal, stories and themes are, what are the stylistic approaches they use and just how and why these manage to resonate with critics and audiences. Are all these films received with equal praise within the director’s home country, are they seen as ‘selling out’? And regardless of what the director themselves might intend or state, are there still conscious or unconscious echoes of national cinematic movements within their work? And what role might financial sources play? Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon received praise yet the director was regarded by some as ‘selling out’ or ‘exploiting’ himself to the West. Luc Besson’s The Fifth Element could be viewed simply as a Hollywood sci-fi with a French Director, yet does the director add far more as an outsider, making more intellectual comment than one may expect from a commercial genre-movie. Not unlike Peter Wier’s Witness and Jane Campion’s The Piano, so many of these works which despite their creative diversity, also evidence their director’s own unique cinematic voice. Likewise, Wim Wenders recent Perfect Days, set in Japan, how far removed is it from the director’s early underpinnings of German Cinema? Perfect Days (2023), Couching Tiger Hidden Dragon (2000), The Piano (1993), Witness (1985),The Fifth Element (1997).

Course Information

Dates:
Tue 05/11/2024 -
Tue 03/12/2024
Times:
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Duration:
5 sessions
Location:
Online
Tutor:
George Cromack
Course code:
Q00018214
How you'll learn:
Online
Availability:
10+ places remaining
Status:
Available
Fee range
Free to £37.00